Archive for the ‘GamesAsLife’ Tag

Resonance

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

I made this game as part of Alan Price’s Computer Game Art & Design II course at Ohio State University’s Advanced Computing Center for Art and Design.  It came out of a series of explorations in Unity’s capabilities and also in using sound to create movement.

The game uses microphone input, but has a “virtual microphone” for the mute, the shy, or the hardware-less.

The game is still very new, so any thoughts, observations, criticism, suggestions, encouragement, etc are all welcome.

Unity plugin install/allowance required:
 https://db.tt/LLys5IKA

titleGraphic

Forward/Inverse

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Forward/Inverse: Gaming cross disciplinary methodologies in dance and digital animation

I created this application for my final project in Motion Capture.  There are credits in the application, but special shout out to Caitlyn Trevor for her cello performance.  🙂  It actually made debugging a joy to hear her playing over and over.

The concepts are all inside the in-game documentation (as well as a bonus video of me dancing in some sweet mocap digs).

Have some fun blending different dance improvisation modalities and learn a little something about digital animation while you’re at it!

As always, you may need to install or allow plug-ins to play this Unity application:
https://db.tt/3icEp1ZK

FKIKthumbnail

<3,
John

Eroding Puzzle: Life Metaphor

Saturday, October 11th, 2014

     I’ve been working on designing this spatial reasoning puzzle.

spatialreasoning

     The puzzle pieces rotate and fit together in a bunch of different ways, forming one or more whole shapes in a number of configurations.

     So, I left the puzzle alone for a couple of days and worked on other things.  Last night, I was having a night alone in my sock-monkey onesie and thinking about ways that my life (events or the whole) could be reflected as a puzzle.

     First of all, what happens after the “win state” of a game?  The Stanley Parable (Davey Wreden and William Pugh, 2013) had me thinking of ways to make a game that is a game, but that has no conclusion.  Conclusions are so Disney.  Life doesn’t stop when you succeed at something.  It’s way more complicated than that.

     So, what if the puzzle changed the longer you played it?  What if the more you try to force the pieces together, the less likely they are to fit together at all?  (memories, relationships, etc?)

     My spatial reasoning puzzle now randomly erodes the longer you play it.  At first, a variety of possibilities.  At last, a narrow set of limitations.  Right now time is what erodes the game state, but I want other inputs to change it as well.

spatialreasoningeroded

 

     I don’t know if want to implement a win state.  I kinda like that you just push the pieces around into some configuration that you find aesthetically pleasing and then enjoy it before it erodes.